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A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked them out. Here are the facts:

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WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Tuesday installed an energetic critic of Big Tech as a top federal regulator at a time when the industry is under intense pressure from Congress, regulators and state attorneys general.

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FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky state Sen. Paul Hornback, a prominent voice on farming as a committee chairman, said Wednesday that he won't seek another term in 2022 but downplayed blistering criticism he received from a fellow Republican, U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie.

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NEW DELHI (AP) — The standoff between the Indian government and Twitter escalated Wednesday when the country’s technology minister accused the social media giant of deliberately not complying with local laws.

CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — A northern Nevada attorney who has questioned the results of the 2020 presidential election and was outside the U.S. Capitol the day it was violently stormed has announced he's running for governor.

LONDON (AP) — Facebook is subject to EU privacy challenges from watchdogs in any of the bloc's member states, not just its lead regulator in Ireland, the bloc's top court ruled Tuesday, in a ruling that has implications for other big tech companies.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — A new federal intelligence report warns that adherents of QAnon, the conspiracy theory embraced by some in the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol, could target Democrats and other political opponents for more violence as the movement's false prophecies increasingly fail to come true.

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MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A woman was killed and three other people were injured when a vehicle drove into demonstrators during a protest in the Minneapolis neighborhood where a Black man was fatally shot this month during his attempted arrest by members of a federal task force, police said Monday.

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Twitter made Juneteenth a company holiday in the U.S. last year. The social media site's employees will celebrate the holiday at work on Friday and on Twitter's website on Saturday.

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Facebook employees will have the option to take a paid day off of work on Friday.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — A group of House lawmakers put forward a sweeping legislative package Friday that could curb the market power of Big Tech companies and force Facebook, Google, Amazon or Apple to sever their dominant platforms from their other lines of business.

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NEW YORK (AP) — The Associated Press' recent firing of a young reporter for what she said on Twitter has somewhat unexpectedly turned company and industry attention to the flip side of social media engagement — the online abuse that many journalists face routinely.

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A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked them out. Here are the facts:

  • Updated

El Paso, Texas-born Lupe Ontiveros plays her first credited role on ABC's "Charlie's Angels" — as a maid. Toward the end of her career she famously says she played a maid more than 150 times, most memorably in “As Good As It Gets.”

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Ilhan Omar tried edging away Thursday from a bitter fight with Jewish Democratic lawmakers who'd accused her of likening the U.S. and Israel to Hamas and Afghanistan's Taliban, saying her remarks were “in no way equating terrorist organizations with democratic countries."

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MOSCOW (AP) — Russian authorities on Thursday ordered Facebook and the messaging app Telegram to pay steep fines for failing to remove banned content, a move that could be part of growing government efforts to tighten control over social media platforms amid political dissent.

NEW YORK (AP) — After feeling the thrill of victory early this year by singlehandedly causing GameStop’s stock to soar — only to get crushed when it quickly crashed back to earth — armies of smaller-pocketed and novice investors are back for more.

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