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Pitcher Tom Seaver, heart and mighty arm of Miracle Mets, dies at 75
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Pitcher Tom Seaver, heart and mighty arm of Miracle Mets, dies at 75

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Tom Seaver, the Hall of Fame pitcher who steered a stunning transformation from lovable losers to Miracle Mets in 1969, has died. He was 75.

The Hall said Wednesday night that Seaver died Monday from complications of Lewy body dementia and COVID-19. Seaver spent his final years in Calistoga, California.

Seaver's family announced in March 2019 he had been diagnosed with dementia and had retired from public life.

He continued working at Seaver Vineyards, founded by the three-time NL Cy Young Award winner and his wife, Nancy, in 2002 on 116 acres at Diamond Mountain in the Calistoga region of Northern California.

Seaver was diagnosed with Lyme disease in 1991, and it reoccurred in 2012 and led to Bell's Palsy and memory loss, the Daily News of New York reported in 2013.

"He will always be the heart and soul of the Mets, the standard which all Mets aspire to," Mike Piazza, a former Mets catcher and Hall of Famer, tweeted when Seaver's dementia diagnosis was announced.

Nicknamed Tom Terrific and The Franchise, Seaver was a five-time 20-game winner and the 1967 NL Rookie of the Year. For his career, from 1967-86, he had a 311-205 record with a 2.86 ERA, 3,640 strikeouts and 61 shutouts. He became a constant on magazine covers and a media presence, calling postseason games on NBC and ABC even while still an active player.

"He was simply the greatest Mets player of all-time and among the best to ever play the game," Mets owner Fred Wilpon and son Jeff, the team's chief operating officer, said in a statement.

Seaver was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1992 when he appeared on 425 of 430 ballots for a then-record 98.84%. His mark was surpassed in 2016 by Ken Griffey Jr., again in 2019 when Mariano Rivera became the first unanimous selection by baseball writers, and in 2020 when Derek Jeter fell one vote short of a clean sweep.

His plaque in Cooperstown lauds him as a "power pitcher who helped change the New York Mets from lovable losers into formidable foes." He changed not only their place in the standings but the team's stature in people's minds.

"Tom was a gentleman who represented the best of our national pastime," Commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement. "He was synonymous with the New York Mets and their unforgettable 1969 season."

"After their improbable World Series championship, Tom became a household name to baseball fans — a responsibility he carried out with distinction throughout his life," he said.

Seaver pitched for the Mets from 1967 until 1977, when he was traded to Cincinnati after a public spat with chairman M. Donald Grant over Seaver's desire for a new contract. It was a clash that inflamed baseball fans in New York.

"Tom Seaver was one of the best and most inspirational pitchers to play the game," Reds Chief Executive Officer Bob Castellini said in a statement. "We are grateful that Tom's Hall of Fame career included time with the Reds. We are proud to count his name among the greats in the Reds Hall of Fame. He will be missed."

Supremely confident -- and not necessarily modest about his extraordinary acumen on the mound -- Seaver was a 12-time All-Star who led the major leagues with a 25-7 record in 1969 and a 1.76 ERA in 1971. A classic power pitcher with a drop-and-drive delivery that often dirtied the right knee of his uniform pants, he won Cy Young Awards with New York in 1969, 1973 and 1975. The club retired his No. 41 in 1988, the first Mets player given the honor.

George Thomas Seaver was born in Fresno, California, on Nov. 17, 1944, a son of Charles Seaver, a top amateur golfer who won both his matches for the U.S. over Britain at the 1932 Walker Cup.

Tom Seaver was a star at the University of Southern California and was drafted by Atlanta in 1966. He signed with the Braves for $51,500 only for Commissioner William Eckert to void the deal. The Trojans already had played exhibition games that year, and baseball rules at the time prohibited a club from signing a college player whose season had started. Any team willing to match the Braves' signing bonus could enter a lottery, and Eckert picked the Mets out of a hat that also included Cleveland and Philadelphia.

Perhaps his most memorable moment on the mound was at Shea Stadium on July 9, 1969, when he retired his first 25 batters against the Chicago Cubs. Pinch-hitter Jimmy Qualls looped a one-out single to left-center in the ninth inning before Seaver retired Willie Smith on a foulout and Don Kessinger on a flyout.

"I had every hitter doing what I wanted," Seaver recalled in 1992. "Afterward, my wife was in tears and I remember saying to her: 'Hey, I pitched a one-hit shutout with 10 strikeouts. What more could I ask for?'"

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